Filed under: Japan, Plants/Manufacturing, Honda, Nissan, Subaru, Toyota



It may be some time before consumers in line for a new Japanese car get their hands on their new ride.

Besides killing thousands of people, shocking the nation's infrastructure and setting off the worst nuclear disaster since Chernobyl, the Japanese earthquake disaster has halted car production on the island indefinitely. Added to that, the tsunami resulting from the quake destroyed thousands of cars and trucks awaiting export.

With production halted and parts supplies drying up, waiting lists for new Japanese cars are mounting. According to CNW Research, those in line for new Japanese cars are, on average, willing to wait 90 days for the delays to end.

Only eight percent of Honda buyers would look elsewhere after a 90-day wait, with the figure climbing to 13 percent for Subaru, 14 percent for Toyota and 19 percent for Nissan.

Those may not seem like huge numbers, until you compare them to comparable American brands. Ford would only lose six percent after 90 days for its cars, and a scant 2.8 percent of truck buyers would bail. Jeep buyers proved most-loyal, with 97.2 percent of their customers sticking around after 90 days.

Would you stand in line for 90 days or more for your new Japanese car of choice? Let us know by voting in our poll.


View Poll


[Source: CNW Research via The Detroit Bureau]Would you wait to buy a Japanese car? [w/poll] originally appeared on Autoblog on Mon, 21 Mar 2011 13:00:00 EST. Please see our terms for use of feeds.



Read | Permalink | Email this | Comments